Movie review

Jawan

Bollywood icon Shah Rukh Khan makes his long-awaited return with “Jawan”, an action-adventure tale about an impetuous terrorist and his team of hostage-taking girls armed with guns.

Khan began his comeback roughly one year ago with a cameo appearance in the otherwise subpar superhero pic “Brahmastra Part One: Shiva.” Subsequently in January he broke out as lead in “Pathaan,” an entertaining spy thriller and part of Yash Raj cinematic universe. Khan will likely delight both longtime fans as well as newcomers with “Jawan,” because he plays familiar hits more sincerely and confidently than before.

jawan poster

“Jawan” was produced by Shah Rukh Khan

Gauri Khan’s Red Chillies Entertainment production company, so it should come as no surprise to witness how familiar its script and mood swings seem to be.

Being a film starring Khan creates certain preconceptions about what audiences should expect – however, too much time was spent convincing viewers they don’t really know Khan as an antihero character after an overdone flashback action sequence wherein Khan took hostages on an entire train ride.

Khan, playing Azad, the warden of a women’s prison, seems to execute a woman wearing a burqa while wearing an irritatingly goofy bald cap that he eventually removes. Following this scene, his character demands of Narmada (Nayanthara), their negotiator: get Agriculture Minister to pay back loans or more people will die.

Jawan” zips from one twist to the next quickly enough that it almost doesn’t matter that its story and set pieces often feel overly familiar and static; some plot twists are also easy enough to predict Azad romances Narmada while befriending her 10-year-old daughter Suji (Seeza Saroj Mehta); denounces corruption within government officials with bloody, media-amplified demonstrations;

speaks up for common folk yet acts erratically with bizarre dance performances among terrified commuters while proudly and laboriously explaining he’s actually fighting public servants who don’t serve their respective nations properly – an entertaining movie with plenty of plot twists!

Jawan star cast.

Featuring Shah Rukh Khan, Nayanthara, and Vijay Sethupathi, Jawan is directed by Atlee and has them all in pivotal parts. Sanjay Dutt and Deepika Padukone both made brief appearances. Aaliyah Qureshi, Lehar Khan, Sanya Malhotra, Girija Oak, and Sanjeeta Bhattacharya all make appearances.

Narmada and Azad’s story connects directly with the opening scene, set 30 years earlier in an unidentified Tibetan village that may or may not be Tibet (terrorized by Asian soldiers wearing green caps studded with stars), through an engaging yet humorous subplot that connects these two scenes in ways you likely won’t find surprising; indeed you may even find delight.

A major plot twist that takes over half of Azad’s narrative shows viewers why his situation now takes precedence over all previous ones.

Vijay Sethupathi) stars as Kalee, an unscrupulous weapons dealer with violent tendencies who has great chemistry with Deepika Padukone despite knowing they no longer need to compete for viewers’ affection.

There’s also an unexpected cameo appearance from an established Bollywood star during opening credits; don’t be taken by surprise when one shows up! Also keep an eye out for a duet dance number between Khan and Padukone which features great chemistry due to having been seen together so often before; don’t miss their duet dance number featuring duet dance number led by Khan and Deepika Padukone; fight scenes are maximalist show stoppers that never bore you!

Jawan falls short in comparison.

to Khan’s other comeback trail stops because its creators included seemingly every masala-style subplot possible. Still, “Jawan” differs from Khan’s last two comeback trail stops because its creators excel at handling its many twists and turns better compared to Khan’s past two comeback trail stops; special recognition should go out to director Atlee (formerly assistant director in Rajinikanth vehicle “Enthiran”) and his creative team for doing an exceptional job navigating his many hairpin bends and turns!

“Jawan” shows Khan looking more relaxed than in recent years, moving leisurely through his repertoire of tics and poses while looking especially comfortable during undemanding musical numbers.

Additionally, his signature Blue Steel look still works wonders whenever he turns on slow-mo heel to pout at viewers or co-stars; overall, “Jawan” uses him just as fans would hope it might.

Khan looks great delivering an emotional yet impassioned speech later on in the film as Azad. Reminding us that we all make mistakes when voting for government officials despite our best intentions, his performance highlights that “Jawan” could have taken more risks; nonetheless their efforts are much appreciated.

Exit mobile version